Anne s confession

Words: 901-1000

Skills: Context Clues Figurative Language Theme

Grades: 4th 5th 6th

Topics: Realistic Fiction

Genres: Prose

Lexile Range:

Lexile Measure:

CCSS: Reading: Literature

Themes:

Anne’s Confession


by Lucy Maud Montgomery from Anne of Green Gables

Chapter XIV passage: It's a sad time at Green Gables. Anne, the young orphan living with the Cuthbert siblings, has confessed to "borrowing" and losing a beloved brooch belonging to Marilla Cuthbert. Her punishment for the crime: she won't be allowed to attend the Sunday School picnic she was so looking forward to. After reading the passage, students will answer questions on the theme, the figurative language, and use context clues to decipher the vocabulary.

Reading Comprehension Passage

Anne’s Confession

by Lucy Maud Montgomery from Anne of Green Gables

Marilla Cuthbert and her brother Matthew have taken Anne Shirley, a young orphan girl, in to live with them on their farm called Green Gables. Anne is a lively girl, full of imagination. In this passage, Marilla can't find a dearly loved brooch, or pin. When Marilla first asked Anne if she knew anything about it, Anne admitted she had tried it on for a moment, but insisted she had put it back. Marilla doesn't believe Anne and sends her to her room until Anne is ready to confess.

Anne has been looking forward to the Sunday School picnic which is to be held that afternoon. Now it appears that she won't be allowed to go. Anne decides to confess to losing the brooch, and she tells Marilla a very detailed story about how she lost the broach. Marilla is angry, and as punishment, she declares Anne must miss the picnic. Poor Anne is very disappointed.

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When her dishes were washed and her bread sponge set and her hens fed Marilla remembered that she had noticed a small rent in her best black lace shawl when she had taken it off on Monday afternoon on returning from the Ladies’ Aid.

She would go and mend it. The shawl was in a box in her trunk. As Marilla lifted it out, the sunlight, falling through the vines that clustered thickly about the window, struck upon something caught in the shawl—something that glittered and sparkled in facets of violet light. Marilla snatched at it with a gasp. It was the amethyst brooch, hanging to a thread of the lace by its catch!

“Dear life and heart,” said Marilla blankly, “what does this mean? Here’s my brooch safe and sound that I thought was at the bottom of Barry’s pond. Whatever did that girl mean by saying she took it and lost it? I declare I believe Green Gables is bewitched. I remember now that when I took off my shawl Monday afternoon I laid it on the bureau for a minute. I suppose the brooch got caught in it somehow. Well!”

Marilla betook herself to the east gable, brooch in hand. Anne had cried herself out and was sitting dejectedly by the window.

“Anne Shirley,” said Marilla solemnly, “I’ve just found my brooch hanging to my black lace shawl. Now I want to know what that rigmarole you told me this morning meant.”

“Why, you said you’d keep me here until I confessed,” returned Anne wearily, “and so I decided to confess because I was bound to get to the picnic. I thought out a confession last night after I went to bed and made it as interesting as I could. And I said it over and over so that I wouldn’t forget it. But you wouldn’t let me go to the picnic after all, so all my trouble was wasted.”

Marilla had to laugh in spite of herself. But her conscience pricked her. “Anne, you do beat all! But I was wrong—I see that now. I shouldn’t have doubted your word when I’d never known you to tell a story. Of course, it wasn’t right for you to confess to a thing you hadn’t done—it was very wrong to do so. But I drove you to it. So if you’ll forgive me, Anne, I’ll forgive you and we’ll start square again. And now get yourself ready for the picnic.”

Anne flew up like a rocket.

“Oh, Marilla, isn’t it too late?”

“No, it’s only two o’clock. They won’t be more than well gathered yet and it’ll be an hour before they have tea. Wash your face and comb your hair and put on your gingham. I’ll fill a basket for you. There’s plenty of stuff baked in the house. And I’ll get Jerry to hitch up the sorrel and drive you down to the picnic ground.”

“Oh, Marilla,” exclaimed Anne, flying to the washstand. “Five minutes ago I was so miserable I was wishing I’d never been born and now I wouldn’t change places with an angel!”

That night a thoroughly happy, completely tired-out Anne returned to Green Gables in a state of beatification impossible to describe.

“Oh, Marilla, I’ve had a perfectly scrumptious time. Scrumptious is a new word I learned today. I heard Mary Alice Bell use it. Isn’t it very expressive? Everything was lovely. We had a splendid tea and then Mr. Harmon Andrews took us all for a row on the Lake of Shining Waters—six of us at a time. And Jane Andrews nearly fell overboard. She was leaning out to pick water lilies and if Mr. Andrews hadn’t caught her by her sash just in the nick of time she’d fallen in and prob’ly been drowned. I wish it had been me. It would have been such a romantic experience to have been nearly drowned. It would be such a thrilling tale to tell. And we had the ice cream. Words fail me to describe that ice cream. Marilla, I assure you it was sublime.”

That evening Marilla told the whole story to Matthew over her stocking basket.

“I’m willing to own up that I made a mistake,” she concluded candidly, “but I’ve learned a lesson. I have to laugh when I think of Anne’s ‘confession,’ although I suppose I shouldn’t for it really was a falsehood. But it doesn’t seem as bad as the other would have been, somehow, and anyhow I’m responsible for it. That child is hard to understand in some respects. But I believe she’ll turn out all right yet. And there’s one thing certain, no house will ever be dull that she’s in.”

Passage Only

Reading Comprehension Questions

1. Why did Marilla say she was wrong?


2. What type of figurative language is "Anne flew up like a rocket"?


3. What does sublime mean here: "Marilla, I assure you it was sublime"?


4. Do you think Anne should have confessed to something she didn't do so she could go to the picnic? Why or why not?