Camp laurence

Words: 501-600

Skills: Context Clues Summary

Grades: 4th 5th 6th

Topics: Realistic Fiction

Genres: Prose

Lexile Range:

Lexile Measure:

CCSS: Reading: Literature

Themes:

Camp Laurence


by Louisa May Alcott from Little Women

Chapter Twelve passage: The well-loved classic "Little Women" tells of four young sisters growing up during the Civil War. In this passage, the girls have been invited to a luncheon and afternoon party hosted by their friend and next door neighbor, Laurie. Students will read the passage and respond to questions about the figurative language and the actions.

Reading Comprehension Passage

Camp Laurence

by Louisa May Alcott from Little Women
Little Women is about the adventures of the four March sisters: Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy. The sisters are growing up during the American Civil War. In this passage, the sisters have been invited by the boy next door, Laurie, to an afternoon party of lunch and croquet. He has friends visiting from England. They are the Vaughan siblings: Kate, Fred, Frank, and Grace. Also at the party are friends of Meg's, Sallie and Ned Moffat, and Laurie's tutor, Mr. Brooke.

As this passage begins, part of the group has just finished a suspect game of croquet and another game called Rig-marole where each player builds on a story started by the first player.

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 "What a piece of nonsense we have made! With practice we might do something quite clever. Do you know Truth?"

"I hope so," said Meg soberly.

"The game, I mean?"

"What is it?" said Fred.

"Why, you pile up your hands, choose a number, and draw out in turn, and the person who draws at the number has to answer truly any question put by the rest. It's great fun."

"Let's try it," said Jo, who liked new experiments.

Miss Kate and Mr. Brooke, Meg, and Ned declined, but Fred, Sallie, Jo, and Laurie piled and drew, and the lot fell to Laurie.

"Who are your heroes?" asked Jo.

"Grandfather and Napoleon."

"Which lady here do you think prettiest?" said Sallie.

"Margaret."

"Which do you like best?" from Fred.

"Jo, of course."

"What silly questions you ask!" And Jo gave a disdainful shrug as the rest laughed at Laurie's matter-of-fact tone.

"Try again. Truth isn't a bad game," said Fred.

"It's a very good one for you," retorted Jo in a low voice. Her turn came next.

"What is your greatest fault?" asked Fred, by way of testing in her the virtue he lacked himself.

"A quick temper."

"What do you most wish for?" said Laurie.

"A pair of boot lacings," returned Jo, guessing and defeating his purpose.

"Not a true answer. You must say what you really do want most."

"Genius. Don't you wish you could give it to me, Laurie?" And she slyly smiled in his disappointed face.

"What virtues do you most admire in a man?" asked Sallie.

"Courage and honesty."

"Now my turn," said Fred, as his hand came last.

"Let's give it to him," whispered Laurie to Jo, who nodded and asked at once...

"Didn't you cheat at croquet?"

"Well, yes, a little bit."

"Good! Didn't you take your story out of The Sea Lion?" said Laurie.

"Rather."

"Don't you think the English nation perfect in every respect?" asked Sallie.

"I should be ashamed of myself if I didn't."

"He's a true John Bull. Now, Miss Sallie, you shall have a chance without waiting to draw. I'll harrrow up your feelings first by asking if you don't think you are something of a flirt," said Laurie, as Jo nodded to Fred as a sign that peace was declared.

"You impertinent boy! Of course I'm not," exclaimed Sallie, with an air that proved the contrary.

"What do you hate most?" asked Fred.

"Spiders and rice pudding."

"What do you like best?" asked Jo.

"Dancing and French gloves."

"Well, I think Truth is a very silly play. Let's have a sensible game of Authors to refresh our minds," proposed Jo.

Passage Only

Reading Comprehension Questions

1. Who does Laurie like best?



2. Who admits to cheating?



3.  What does proved to the contrary mean here: " 'You impertinent boy! Of course I'm not,' exclaimed Sallie, with an air that proved the contrary."



4.  Do you think Truth sounds like a fun game to play? Why or why not?