How dorothy saved the scare

Words: 401-500

Skills: Compare and Contrast Summary Symbolism

Grades: 4th 5th

Topics: Adventure / Thriller and Science Fiction / Fantasy

Genres: Prose

Lexile Range: 1060L - 1290L

Lexile Measure: 1120L

CCSS: Reading: Literature

Themes:

How Dorothy Saved the Scarecrow


by L. Frank Baum from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Chapter 3 Passage: J. Frank Baum's "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" tells the story of a young Kansas girl Dorothy. A cyclone picked up the house she was living in and lifted it to the magical world of Oz. The house landed on the Wicked Witch of the East and killed the witch. Dorothy was given the witch's powerful silver shoes by the Good Witch of the North. She told Dorothy to travel to the Emerald City to speak to the great Wizard in order to return home to Kansas. In this passage, Dorothy is traveling through the land of the Munchkins on her way to see the Wizard. Students will read the passage and answer questions on the color symbols and compare attitudes toward Dorothy.

Reading Comprehension Passage

How Dorothy Saved the Scarecrow

by L. Frank Baum from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
J. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz tells the story of a young Kansas girl Dorothy. A cyclone picked up the house she was living in and lifted it to the magical world of Oz. The house landed on the Wicked Witch of the East and killed the witch. Dorothy was given the witch's powerful silver shoes by the Good Witch of the North. She told Dorothy to travel to the Emerald City to speak to the great Wizard in order to return home to Kansas. In this passage, Dorothy is traveling through the land of the Munchkins on her way to Oz.

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There were several roads nearby, but it did not take her long to find the one paved with yellow bricks. Within a short time she was walking briskly toward the Emerald City, her silver shoes tinkling merrily on the hard, yellow road-bed. The sun shone bright and the birds sang sweetly, and Dorothy did not feel nearly so bad as you might think a little girl would who had been suddenly whisked away from her own country and set down in the midst of a strange land.

Toward evening, when Dorothy was tired with her long walk and began to wonder where she should pass the night, she came to a house rather larger than the rest. On the green lawn before it many men and women were dancing. Five little fiddlers played as loudly as possible, and the people were laughing and singing, while a big table near by was loaded with delicious fruits and nuts, pies and cakes, and many other good things to eat.

The people greeted Dorothy kindly, and invited her to supper and to pass the night with them; for this was the home of one of the richest Munchkins in the land, and his friends were gathered with him to celebrate their freedom from the bondage of the Wicked Witch.

Dorothy ate a hearty supper and was waited upon by the rich Munchkin himself, whose name was Boq. Then she sat upon a settee and watched the people dance.

When Boq saw her silver shoes he said, "You must be a great sorceress."

"Why?" asked the girl.

"Because you wear silver shoes and have killed the Wicked Witch. Besides, you have white in your frock, and only witches and sorceresses wear white."

"My dress is blue and white checked," said Dorothy, smoothing out the wrinkles in it.

"It is kind of you to wear that," said Boq. "Blue is the color of the Munchkins, and white is the witch color. So we know you are a friendly witch."

Dorothy did not know what to say to this, for all the people seemed to think her a witch, and she knew very well she was only an ordinary little girl who had come by the chance of a cyclone into a strange land.


Passage Only

Reading Comprehension Questions

1. Why were the Munchkins celebrating?



2. What did the white in Dorothy's dress mean to the Munchkins?



3. Why did the Munchkins know that Dorothy was friendly?



4. Compare what the Munchkins thought of Dorothy and what Dorothy thought of herself.