Sonnets from the portuguese

Words: 101-200

Skills: Context Clues Rhythm & Rhyme Theme

Grades: 10th 11th 12th

Topics: Romance

Genres: Poetry

Lexile Range:

Lexile Measure:

CCSS: Reading: Literature

Themes:

Sonnet XLIII


by Elizabeth Barrett Browning from Sonnets from the Portuguese

One of the greatest love poems of all times, Elizabeth Barrett Browning dedicated this poem to her husband, Robert Browning. Students will read the poem and respond to questions on the language, the rhyme, and the theme.

Reading Comprehension Passage

Sonnet XLIII

by Elizabeth Barrett Browning from Sonnets from the Portuguese

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.

I love thee to the depth and breadth and height

My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight

For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.

I love thee to the level of everyday’s

Most quiet need, by sun and candlelight.

I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;

I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.

I love thee with the passion put to use

In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.

I love thee with a love I seemed to lose

With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,

Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,

I shall but love thee better after death.

Passage Only

Reading Comprehension Questions

1. What is the rhyme scheme of the poem?


2. What does strive mean here: "I love thee freely, as men strive for Right"?


3. What is one example of alliteration in the poem?


4. What do you think the poet means when she says, "I shall but love thee better after death"?