Jo meets apollyon

Words: 601-700

Skills: Character Traits Story Elements Summary

Grades: 4th 5th 6th

Topics: Realistic Fiction

Genres: Prose

Lexile Range: 1060L - 1290L

Lexile Measure: 1150L

CCSS: Reading: Literature

Themes:

Jo Meets Apollyon


by Louisa May Alcott from Little Women

Chapter Eight passage: "Little Women" by Louisa May Alcott was published in two parts in 1868 and 1869. It is the story of four sisters: Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March. In this passage, Jo is angry with her little sister Amy. Amy burned the book Jo was writing because Jo wouldn’t allow Amy to go with her to the theater. Now Jo has gone skating with Laurie, the boy who lives next door. Amy has followed without permission.

Reading Comprehension Passage

Jo Meets Apollyon

by Louisa May Alcott from Little Women
Little Women is the story of four sisters: Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March. In this passage, Jo is angry with her little sister Amy. Amy burned the book Jo was writing because Jo wouldn’t allow Amy to go with her to the theater. Now Jo has gone skating with Laurie, the boy who lives next door. Amy has followed without permission.  

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Jo heard Amy panting after her run, stamping her feet and blowing on her fingers as she tried to put her skates on, but Jo never turned and went slowly zigzagging down the river, taking a bitter, unhappy sort of satisfaction in her sister’s troubles. She had cherished her anger till it grew strong and took possession of her, as evil thoughts and feelings always do unless cast out at once. As Laurie turned the bend, he shouted back...

“Keep near the shore. It isn’t safe in the middle.” Jo heard, but Amy was struggling to her feet and did not catch a word. Jo glanced over her shoulder, and the little demon she was harboring said in her ear...

“No matter whether she heard or not, let her take care of herself.”

Laurie had vanished round the bend, Jo was just at the turn, and Amy, far behind, striking out toward the smoother ice in the middle of the river. For a minute Jo stood still with a strange feeling in her heart, then she resolved to go on, but something held and turned her round, just in time to see Amy throw up her hands and go down, with a sudden crash of rotten ice, the splash of water, and a cry that made Jo’s heart stand still with fear. She tried to call Laurie, but her voice was gone. She tried to rush forward, but her feet seemed to have no strength in them, and for a second, she could only stand motionless, staring with a terror-stricken face at the little blue hood above the black water. Something rushed swiftly by her, and Laurie’s voice cried out...

“Bring a rail. Quick, quick!”

How she did it, she never knew, but for the next few minutes she worked as if possessed, blindly obeying Laurie, who was quite self-possessed, and lying flat, held Amy up by his arm and hockey stick till Jo dragged a rail from the fence, and together they got the child out, more frightened than hurt.

“Now then, we must walk her home as fast as we can. Pile our things on her, while I get off these confounded skates,” cried Laurie, wrapping his coat round Amy, and tugging away at the straps which never seemed so intricate before.

Shivering, dripping, and crying, they got Amy home, and after an exciting time of it, she fell asleep, rolled in blankets before a hot fire. During the bustle Jo had scarcely spoken but flown about, looking pale and wild, with her things half off, her dress torn, and her hands cut and bruised by ice and rails and refractory buckles. When Amy was comfortably asleep, the house quiet, and Mrs. March sitting by the bed, she called Jo to her and began to bind up the hurt hands.

“Are you sure she is safe?” whispered Jo, looking remorsefully at the golden head, which might have been swept away from her sight forever under the treacherous ice.

“Quite safe, dear. She is not hurt, and won’t even take cold, I think, you were so sensible in covering and getting her home quickly,” replied her mother cheerfully.

“Laurie did it all. I only let her go. Mother, if she should die, it would be my fault.” And Jo dropped down beside the bed in a passion of penitent tears, telling all that had happened, bitterly condemning her hardness of heart, and sobbing out her gratitude for being spared the heavy punishment which might have come upon her.

“It’s my dreadful temper! I try to cure it, I think I have, and then it breaks out worse than ever. Oh, Mother, what shall I do? What shall I do?” cried poor Jo, in despair.

Passage Only

Reading Comprehension Questions

1. Where was the ice unsafe?  



2. What did Laurie and Jo use to get Amy out of  the ice?  



3. What did Jo blame for the accident?  



4.  Why didn’t Jo warn Amy about the ice?