The little house

Words: 601-700

Skills: Character Traits Main / Central Idea Summary Symbolism

Grades: 4th 5th

Topics: Adventure / Thriller and Science Fiction / Fantasy

Genres: Prose

Lexile Range: 420L - 730L

Lexile Measure: 650L

CCSS: Reading: Literature

Themes:

The Little House


by J.M. Barrie from Peter Pan

Chapter 6 Passage: J.M. Barrie's 1911 classic novel "Peter Pan" is about the impish boy who doesn't want to grow up. It tells of his adventures in Neverland with the Darling children, the Lost Boys, and the evil Captain Hook. In this passage, Peter's jealous friend Tinker Bell has convinced the Lost Boys to shoot Wendy with an arrow. But it is Peter's gift that saves the day. Students will read the passage and answer comprehension questions and make an inference about one of the key symbols.

Reading Comprehension Passage

The Little House

by J.M. Barrie from Peter Pan
The book Peter Pan is about the magical flying boy Peter Pan who lives in an amazing place called Neverland. It is to Neverland that he has brought his new friends: Wendy, Michael, and John. Once there, Wendy becomes a pretend mother to the other children there, called the Lost Boys. Peter's fairy friend, Tinker Bell, has become jealous of Wendy and plots to get rid of her. In this passage, Tinker Bell has convinced the Lost Boys that Peter wants them to shoot Wendy with an arrow while he is gone. Poor Tootles shoots Wendy just as Peter returns. The arrow hits Wendy's button necklace that Peter had given her. Peter called it a "kiss."

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It was at this tragic moment that they heard a sound which made the heart of every one of them rise to his mouth. They heard Peter crow.

“Peter!” they cried, for it was always thus that he signalled his return.

“Hide her,” they whispered, and gathered hastily around Wendy. But Tootles stood aloof.

Again came that ringing crow, and Peter dropped in front of them. “Greetings, boys,” he cried, and mechanically they saluted, and then again was silence.

He frowned.

“I am back,” he said hotly, “why do you not cheer?”

They opened their mouths, but the cheers would not come. He overlooked it in his haste to tell the glorious tidings.

“Great news, boys,” he cried, “I have brought at last a mother for you all.”

Still no sound, except a little thud from Tootles as he dropped on his knees.

“Have you not seen her?” asked Peter, becoming troubled. “She flew this way.”

“Ah me!” one voice said, and another said, “Oh, mournful day.”

Tootles rose. “Peter,” he said quietly, “I will show her to you,” and when the others would still have hidden her he said, “Back, twins, let Peter see.”

So they all stood back, and let him see, and after he had looked for a little time he did not know what to do next.

“She is dead,” he said uncomfortably. “Perhaps she is frightened at being dead.”

He thought of hopping off in a comic sort of way till he was out of sight of her, and then never going near the spot any more. They would all have been glad to follow if he had done this.

But there was the arrow. He took it from her heart and faced his band.

“Whose arrow?” he demanded sternly.

“Mine, Peter,” said Tootles on his knees.

“Oh, dastard hand,” Peter said, and he raised the arrow to use it as a dagger.

Tootles did not flinch. He bared his breast. “Strike, Peter,” he said firmly, “strike true.”

Twice did Peter raise the arrow, and twice did his hand fall. “I cannot strike,” he said with awe, “there is something stays my hand.”

All looked at him in wonder, save Nibs, who fortunately looked at Wendy.

“It is she,” he cried, “the Wendy lady, see, her arm!”

Wonderful to relate, Wendy had raised her arm. Nibs bent over her and listened reverently. “I think she said, ‘Poor Tootles,’” he whispered.

“She lives,” Peter said briefly.

Slightly cried instantly, “The Wendy lady lives.”

Then Peter knelt beside her and found his button. You remember she had put it on a chain that she wore round her neck.

“See,” he said, “the arrow struck against this. It is the kiss I gave her. It has saved her life.”

“I remember kisses,” Slightly interposed quickly, “let me see it. Ay, that’s a kiss.”

Passage Only

Reading Comprehension Questions

1. What did Peter do to tell the Lost Boys he had returned?



2. Why couldn't Peter strike Tootles with the arrow?



3. Do you think Peter and Slightly know what a real kiss is? Why or why not?



4. What did Peter first think of doing when he saw that Wendy might be dead?