The prologue from romeo and juliet

Words: 101-200

Skills: Story Elements Summary Theme

Grades: 8th 9th 10th

Topics: Dramatic Tragedies

Genres: Drama

Lexile Range: 1300L +

Lexile Measure: 1300L

CCSS: Reading: Literature

Themes:

The Prologue from Romeo and Juliet


by William Shakespeare from Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is the classic tragedy of feuding families and star-crossed lovers. This passage is the prologue from the play. Students will read the passage and respond to questions about setting the scene and how the prologue forecasts the play.

Reading Comprehension Passage

The Prologue from Romeo and Juliet

by William Shakespeare from Romeo and Juliet

[Enter Chorus.]

Chor.
Two households, both alike in dignity,
   In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
   Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
   A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whose misadventur'd piteous overthrows
   Doth with their death bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
   And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which but their children's end naught could remove,
   Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which, if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.

Passage Only

Reading Comprehension Questions

1. The Prologue sets the scene. Where does the Chorus say that the play takes place?



2. Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy. Write three words or phrases from the Prologue that indicate the play will end sadly.



3. What does "the two hours' traffic of our stage" mean?



4.  The story tells of two rival families: the Capulets and the Montagues. Give two references from the Prologue that show the conflict between the families.


Vocabulary List

Vocabulary List

Each of the vocabulary words below are used in the reading passage. As you read the passage, pay attention to context clues that suggest the word’s meaning.


  1. mutiny
  2. overthrows
  3. strife
  4. attend
  5. toil

Context Clues

Context Clues

Using context clues from the sentences in the passage, underline the correct meaning of the word in boldface.

1. “From ancient grudge break to new mutiny

a. changes; alterations      b. riot or rebellion     c. heroics; rescues     d. grief or sadness

2. “Whose misadventur'd piteous overthrows

a. children; offspring     b. cries; wails     c. defeats or downfalls     d. decisions; plans

3. “Doth with their death bury their parents' strife

a. argument; conflict     b. future or hope     c. reputation; regard     d. happiness or joy

4. “The which, if you with patient ears attend

a. delay; await     b. pardon or forgive     c. add to; attach     d. listen or follow

5. “What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend”

a. price or amount     b. belief; attitude     c. work; effort     d. laws or rules