The road through the forest

Words: 701-800

Skills: Story Elements Summary Theme

Grades: 4th 5th

Topics: Adventure / Thriller and Science Fiction / Fantasy

Genres: Prose

Lexile Range: 740L - 1050L

Lexile Measure: 900L

CCSS: Reading: Literature

Themes:

The Road Through the Forest


by L. Frank Baum from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Chapter 4 Passage: "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" was written by L. Frank Baum. It's the story of Dorothy, a girl from Kansas, who was take by a tornado to the magical land of Oz. In order to return home, she must go to the Emerald City and speak to the powerful Wizard of Oz. On her way, she meets a talking scarecrow. In this passage, the Scarecrow tells the story of his life. Students will read the passage and answer questions on the main idea and the details of the story.

Reading Comprehension Passage

The Road Through the Forest

by L. Frank Baum from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was written by L. Frank Baum. It's the story of Dorothy, a girl from Kansas, who was take by a tornado to the magical land of Oz. In order to return home, she must go to the Emerald City and speak to the powerful Wizard of Oz. On her way, she meets a talking scarecrow. In this passage, the Scarecrow tells the story of his life.

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"Won't you tell me a story, while we are resting?" asked the child.

 The Scarecrow looked at her reproachfully, and answered:

"My life has been so short that I really know nothing whatever. I was only made day before yesterday. What happened in the world before that time is all unknown to me. Luckily, when the farmer made my head, one of the first things he did was to paint my ears, so that I heard what was going on. There was another Munchkin with him, and the first thing I heard was the farmer saying, 'How do you like those ears?'

"'They aren't straight,'" answered the other.

"'Never mind,'" said the farmer. "'They are ears just the same,'" which was true enough.

"'Now I'll make the eyes,'" said the farmer. So he painted my right eye, and as soon as it was finished I found myself looking at him and at everything around me with a great deal of curiosity, for this was my first glimpse of the world.

"'That's a rather pretty eye,'" remarked the Munchkin who was watching the farmer. "'Blue paint is just the color for eyes.'

"'I think I'll make the other a little bigger,'" said the farmer. And when the second eye was done I could see much better than before. Then he made my nose and my mouth. But I did not speak, because at that time I didn't know what a mouth was for. I had the fun of watching them make my body and my arms and legs; and when they fastened on my head, at last, I felt very proud, for I thought I was just as good a man as anyone.

"'This fellow will scare the crows fast enough,' said the farmer. 'He looks just like a man.'

"'Why, he is a man,' said the other, and I quite agreed with him. The farmer carried me under his arm to the cornfield, and set me up on a tall stick, where you found me. He and his friend soon after walked away and left me alone.

"I did not like to be deserted this way. So I tried to walk after them. But my feet would not touch the ground, and I was forced to stay on that pole. It was a lonely life to lead, for I had nothing to think of, having been made such a little while before. Many crows and other birds flew into the cornfield, but as soon as they saw me they flew away again, thinking I was a Munchkin; and this pleased me and made me feel that I was quite an important person. By and by an old crow flew near me, and after looking at me carefully he perched upon my shoulder and said:

"'I wonder if that farmer thought to fool me in this clumsy manner. Any crow of sense could see that you are only stuffed with straw.' Then he hopped down at my feet and ate all the corn he wanted. The other birds, seeing he was not harmed by me, came to eat the corn too, so in a short time there was a great flock of them about me.

"I felt sad at this, for it showed I was not such a good Scarecrow after all; but the old crow comforted me, saying, 'If you only had brains in your head you would be as good a man as any of them, and a better man than some of them. Brains are the only things worth having in this world, no matter whether one is a crow or a man.'

 "After the crows had gone I thought this over, and decided I would try hard to get some brains. By good luck you came along and pulled me off the stake, and from what you say I am sure the Great Oz will give me brains as soon as we get to the Emerald City."


Passage Only

Reading Comprehension Questions

1. What was the first thing the Munchkin farmer made when he made the Scarecrow's head?



2. Why couldn't the Scarecrow speak at first?



3. What did the old crow say were "the only things worth having in this world"?



4. What does the Scarecrow want from the great Wizard of Oz?