Two little foxes illustration

Words: 301-400

Skills: Context Clues Fact and Opinion Figurative Language

Grades: K 1st 2nd

Topics: Humor

Genres: Prose

Lexile Range:

Lexile Measure:

CCSS: Reading: Foundational Skills

Themes:

Two Little Foxes


by Elizabeth Trach

Mabel and Marty are two young foxes that live in the woods. One day they have an adventure that leads them to make a new friend. Students will read the passage and answer follow-up questions about vocabulary and other story elements. This passage contains the following Dolch sight words: ask, old, by, tree, and wood.

Reading Comprehension Passage

Two Little Foxes

by Elizabeth Trach

Mabel and Marty lived in the forest. The little foxes liked to play in the sun, so they woke up early and ran off to the meadow each morning. The meadow was bright and sunny.

One hot day, Mabel and Marty grew tired of the meadow. They wanted to rest in the shade.

"I think we should try that big old tree," said Mabel.

"Which one?" asked Marty. "The forest is full of trees."

Mabel pointed to the tallest tree. It stood at the edge of the meadow by a fence made of wood.

The two little foxes started the long walk to the other side of the grassy meadow. They laughed and skipped. When they got to the tree, they sat down. The tree was so large that they could lean against the trunk like a comfortable chair.

Once Mabel and Marty cooled off in the shade, they began to tell each other jokes. Mabel was very funny, and Marty laughed loudly. Soon they were rolling on the ground, laughing so hard they could barely breathe.

Plop! An acorn dropped right on Mabel's head. Plop! Another one feel on Marty. Both foxes looked up to see an angry mother bird on the branch above their heads.

"I must ask you to please keep quiet!" the bird tweeted. "My babies are trying to sleep in their nest. You are far too loud."

Mabel and Marty stopped laughing. "We're sorry," Mabel said. Marty nodded in agreement.

The two little foxes sat quietly for a few minutes. Marty was thinking about Mabel's funny joke, and his sides began to shake. Mabel looked at Marty and began to laugh. She clapped her paws over her mouth, but it was too late. Trying not to laugh felt very funny. It only made the two foxes want to laugh even more.

Finally, Marty let out a loud guffaw. He laughed so loudly that all the little birds began peeping. Before the mother bird could drop more acorns on their heads, Mabel and Marty ran away across the meadow, laughing as they went.

"We're sorry!" called Mabel as she ran. The two foxes decided to play in the meadow for the rest of the day, even if it was hot. That way they could have fun without upsetting the bird family. And that's exactly what they did.

Passage Only

Reading Comprehension Questions

1. Why do the foxes want to sit under the tree?

 

 

 

 

 

2. Why is the mother bird angry?

 

 

 

 

 

3. According to the story, what does the word "guffaw" mean?

 

 

 

 

 

4. Have you ever tried to stop laughing? Was it easy or hard?