Romance Reading Passages

Traditionally, romance works are narratives of the adventures and exploits of medieval knights. These may be prose or poetry and include examples of chivalry and bravery. A more modern use of romance works includes stories about love and courtship of two characters who face an obstacle or barrier to their relationship.

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The French Revolution

The French Revolution began in 1789 and took the idea of modern democracy from the fledgling United States to Europe. A period of social, political, and economic upheaval, it has been the setting for many seminal works by major authors, including Charles Dickens and Victor Hugo. This Reading Set includes both fiction and nonfiction passages along with related reading comprehension questions.

Reading Set: 6 Passages

Edgar Allan Poe

Macabre, dark, foreboding; these adjectives are often used to describe the works of Edgar Allan Poe. While this is true of many of his more notable works, like "The Raven" and "The Fall of the House of Usher," Poe wrote other less ominous poems and stories as well. This Reading Set includes passages for many of Poe's most famous works, as well as some lesser-known treasures.

Reading Set: 5 Passages

Paris: September 1792

by Baroness Orczy from The Scarlet Pimpernel

Chapter I passage: The adventure novel “The Scarlet ...

689 Words, 9th-11th Grades, 1060L - 1290L, Character Traits, Figurative Language, and Story Elements

Annabel Lee

by Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe wrote “Annabel Lee” in 1849. It was ...

333 Words, 6th-9th Grades, 740L - 1050L, Context Clues, Figurative Language, and Rhythm & Rhyme

The Winning of Knighthood

by Howard Pyle from The Story of King Arthur and His Knights

Chapter III passage: Howard Pyle wrote The Story of ...

626 Words, 4th-6th Grades, 1060L - 1290L, Context Clues

Friendship in a Bottle

Students will read a story about a message in a bottle and how it brought two strangers together. Students will answer question...

537 Words, 5th-6th Grades, 740L - 1050L, Compare and Contrast, Main / Central Idea, Story Elements, and Summary