Conclusion Transition Words

Conclusion Transition Words - a helpful writing guide

Welcome to our lesson on conclusion transition words! As you probably know, a conclusion is the final paragraph of an essay or paper. It’s where you wrap up your main points and give your final thoughts on the topic. Conclusion transition words are words or phrases that signal to your reader that you’re coming to the end of your essay and summing up your main points. These words help to smooth out your writing and make your conclusion more powerful and effective.

Tips for brainstorming and researching conclusion words:

  1. Start by making a list of your main points. These will be the building blocks of your conclusion, so it’s important to have them clear in your mind.
  2. Think about the tone of your essay. Do you want to end on a serious note, or do you want to leave your reader with a sense of hope or inspiration? Choose your conclusion transition words accordingly.
  3. Do some research! There are tons of lists of conclusion transition words out there, so take some time to look for ones that fit your essay and your tone.
  4. Don’t be afraid to get creative! If you can’t find the perfect conclusion transition word, try coming up with your own.

List of conclusion transition words:

  • After all
  • All in all
  • All things considered
  • Altogether
  • As a result
  • Finally
  • In brief
  • In conclusion
  • In essence
  • In short
  • In summary
  • In the final analysis
  • To conclude
  • To sum up
  • To summarize
  • Ultimately

Conclusion transition word sentence examples:

  1. In conclusion, the evidence clearly shows that wearing helmets while riding a bike is important for safety.
  2. Ultimately, it is clear that a healthy diet and regular exercise are key to living a long and happy life.
  3. To sum up, the main points of our presentation were the benefits of solar energy, the environmental impact of fossil fuels, and the economic advantages of investing in renewable energy sources.
  4. In short, we can see that the benefits of reading far outweigh the cost of purchasing books.
  5. As a result, it is important for all of us to be aware of the effects of pollution and to take steps to reduce our own carbon footprint.

Concluding Sentence examples from famous speeches:

  1. “In conclusion, let me say this: you are a young and talented generation. The world is yours, as long as you’re willing to reach out and take it.” – Barack Obama
  2. “So I say to you, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” – John F. Kennedy
  3. “In the final analysis, it is not what we do, but how well we do it that counts.” – Martin Luther King Jr.
  4. “To conclude, I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.'” – Martin Luther King Jr.
  5. “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.” – John F. Kennedy

Conclusion transition word examples from literature:

  1. “And so, my dear friends, I come to the end of this chapter of my life. I shall always be glad to have been of service to you, and I hope that you will be a little glad, too.” – Paddington Bear
  2. “In conclusion, I can only tell you that there is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments, and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance.” – Edgar Allan Poe
  3. “In the final analysis, it is not what we do, but how well we do it that counts.” – Martin Luther King Jr.
  4. “To conclude, I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.'” – Martin Luther King Jr.
  5. “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.” – John F. Kennedy

Helpful transition word practice activities:

  1. Have your students write a short essay on a topic of their choice, and have them come up with their own conclusion transition words to end the essay.
  2. Give your students a list of conclusion transition words and have them choose the best one for each sentence.
  3. Have your students write a few paragraphs on a topic, and then have them swap papers with a partner. Have them add a conclusion paragraph using a transition word that they think fits best.
  4. Try incorporating conclusion transition words into your daily language and discussions with your students. For example, you could say “In conclusion, the main idea of this lesson was…” or “To summarize, the three key points we discussed today were…”

Conclusion transition words are a great way to wrap up your essays and papers in a clear and concise manner. They help to signal to your reader that you’re coming to the end and summing up your main points. With a little practice and the help of these handy transition words, your students will be writing powerful and effective conclusions in no time! And remember, always proofread your work to make sure you’re using the best transition words for the job. Happy writing!

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